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Innovation in television held back by television companies, not technology

Much of the technology hype these days surrounds reinventing television. Apple has long been suspected of designing a unique television experience. Samsung and other hardware makers have already launched so-called smart TVs. The goal of smart TVs is admirable – to improve the television watching user experience, something technology companies like Apple excel at. But unfortunately, these smart TVs are not yet better experiences. The may have Netflix and other apps built in, but often they are just portals to select web services with even fewer options. What’s more unfortunate is improving the television experience is simple and obvious, yet is no where closer to being implemented. That’s because the television companies do not want a better experience.

Consider Aereo, a technology start-up attempting to compromise copyright law with useful television viewing service over the internet. Aereo will install an antenna for every subscribing user and stream them broadcast television for a monthly fee.  Their argument is it is legal to freely access broadcast television with an antenna, they just change the location of the antenna. So far the courts have upheld Aereo’s claim, which has led News Corp. COO Chase Carey threatens he may pull all Fox channels to cable. Aereo’s incredibly inefficient and costly process of offering consumers a useful product is met with legal attacks and innovation crushing tactics by the television companies.

What does this better experience look like? Well, simply, on-demand television. Let us watch the shows we want when we want to watch them. The whole concept of a TV schedule is archaic in the age of YouTube and Netflix. Rumors claim both Apple and Google have lobbied television companies to allow there shows to appear on new TV platforms, but for TV companies, the money is just too significant under the current regime for them to risk changing it.

Because television companies refuse to move toward an on-demand type model, the television experience remains sub-optimal. Television requires following someone else’s schedule (or using expensive DVR equipment), paying extremely high cable fees for channels you don’t want, and not being able to view content across multiple devices. We have wi-fi and 4g data, but never few ways to watch television over them.

Incumbent companies are able to block innovation and new business opportunities in order to protect their own profits; profits that partially result from using free, public airwaves.  Copyright and intellectual property are supposed to be encouraging innovation, yet time and time again we see the established companies using their entrenched positions to limit consumer choice and prevent innovation.  So consumers continue to over pay for flawed products, not what capitalism and competition are supposed to be about.


So, what do you think ?